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Pre-Tupping with Crystalyx

  • 18
    Aug

    Pre-Tupping with Crystalyx

    FLUSHING & TUPPING WITH CRYSTALYX EXTRA HIGH ENERGY

     

    Nutrition during the weeks before mating should ensure all ewes are in the correct body condition score by the time they join the ram. Why bother?

     

    Because over fat or thin ewes never perform well:

     

    They take longer to come on heat when rams are turned in

    Oestrus period is erratic, with fewer eggs shed

    They are more likely to be barren, prolapse or get twin lamb disease when pregnant.

     

    FIT EWES ARE MORE FERTILE AND PRODUCE MORE LAMBS

     

    Remember – fat ewes are likely to be those who have not milked well or only raised a single lamb. Reducing their condition score is likely to encourage better ovulation rates.  Conversely, thin ewes deserve some preferential treatment as they are probably the ones who have worked hardest and weaned most lambs.  The skill of the shepherd is to maximise flock performance at a time when herbage quality and availability are declining – this is where Crystalyx can help.

     

    CRYSTALYX Extra High Energy provides a palatable, concentrated energy source containing all the minerals, trace elements and vitamins often lacking in grass, to ensure optimum fertility and performance.

     

    Independent research at Newcastle University has shown that feeding Crystalyx can:

     

    Stimulate forage intakes and improve overall diet digestibility, resulting in more efficient use of forage and an improved available energy intake.

    Improve condition and liveweight of ewes faster than grass alone (+2kg in 6 weeks)

    Improve lamb numbers (+12% over controls – all as extra twins)

    Typical Crystalyx intakes are 50g/ewe/day

     

    Commercial trials have demonstrated that Crystalyx can help maintain nutrient intake when forage availability is poor:

     

    In wet weather when grass dry matter and energy contents fall

    During frost and snow cover when grass is less accessible.

    Written by Dr Cliff Lister at 10:12 Tags: Farming Interest,